H. Angelo’s 1845 Target Rose Recreated

For the month of July, 2017, Columbia Classical Fencing instruction will take a brief excursion into the realm of cutlass and sabre. We will be training with short single sticks which are fast and satisfying to use. We will base our instruction largely on the work of Henry Angelo’s (The Younger) 1812 Naval Cutlass Exercises and his 1845 Infantry Sword Exercises. For our reference (and ease of reading) as an instructional aid, I have recreated his target rose from the latter. It is posted here in draft copy form for your reference and use. Should individuals outside of CCF make use of this recreation, please provide appropriate attribution and link back to CCF.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Posted in Announcement, Artwork, Weapons | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Early Registration Extended for American Smallsword Symposium

Early registration for the 2017 American Smallsword Symposium is extended until April 15th, 2017. Additionally daily registration rates are now available. For more information, consult the Symposium’s website.

 

Save

Posted in Workshop | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Angelo on Tempo

In all attacks, whether Cut or Thrusts, the motion ought to increase in velocity, the greatest force being given at the last: the same rule should be observed in stepping out to the Second and Third Positions; but in recovering, the reverse is to be attended to, as the first part is the quickest…

-H.C. Angleo, 1845

Quote | Posted on by | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Escrime Motion Studies, 1890

Escrime motion studies, Marey Films, 1890.

Étienne-Jules Marey was a French scientist and pioneer in several fields. His early work was in medicine, studying blood flow, but his studies ventured into locomotion where he engaged photographic analysis. His achievements include development of early motion photographic techniques that would prove instrumental in furthering cinematography and high-speed photography, as well as the development of related photographic equipment.

Étienne Jules Marey around 1880, by Félix Nadar.

This includes creating the sub-field that came to be known as chronophotography wherein Marey devised techniques to record multiple images on a single negative at a rate of 12 frames per second (see the prior post of a fencer’s lunge motion by his protégé, Lucien Bull, here).  Though the French are proud of Marey’s vast accomplishments, he conducted some of his work in Naples after the mid 1870’s. His later work which analyzed smoke trails would contribute to the development of the first wind tunnel.

The excerpted video below is from Marey’s studies of human motion (Volume VII) in 1890.  It shows the movement of fencers’ exchanges with foil and sabre, first demonstrated at speed, then in slow motion.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Posted in Artwork, History | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lucien Bull, Lunge Motion, 1909

Lucien Bull, High Speed Photograph, 1909. Courtesy Bryn Mawr College

Lucien Bull, High Speed Photograph, 1909. Courtesy Bryn Mawr College Library and Information Technology Services.

Lucien Bull was  a pioneer of early high speed photography. A Dubliner who moved to France, Bull worked with Étienne-Jules Marey to develop techniques to record and study motion. Much of their work involved recording successive still images (a la flip-book style) to record and render motion. This was accomplished via what came to be known as the “gun camera” due to its physical appearance. However, this still image differs in that it exhibits multiple, successive, high-speed exposures to record the motion of a lunge on a single negative.

Our thanks goes out to Maeve White of Bryn Mawr College Library and Information Technology Services for her permission to share her work-related photograph of the original negative (left). It was processed into the positive above.

 

Save

Save

Posted in Artwork | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment